CAMDEN NJ - Life and work on and along the Delaware River

CAMDEN, NEW JERSEY

LIFE AND WORK
ON AND ALONG THE DELAWARE RIVER

Dave Boone, son of Camden fire fighter Maurice Boone and nephew of Camden fire fighter George Boone, spent most of his professional life working on or with the tugboats that ply the Delaware, serving the ports of Camden and Philadelphia. Since retiring in 1999, he has made a name for himself as a painter, concentrating of tugboats and other waterfront scenes.

During the summer of 2006, Dave was kind enough to furnish 3 discs with high-resolution scans of various images of Camden, mostly pictures involving the river in one way or another. The sheer volume of images and my desire to try and get the page that would host them up in an orderly fashion dictated that I would have to block out some time to create a page for them. Family and work obligations being what they are, I am setting up the page with links to the images first, and will add thumbnails or quick loading versions later, as these images really deserve to be available to the public, and I do not want to delay this any further.

Please write with any comments!

Phil Cohen
Camden NJ
September 22, 2006

Mary Allaband Erekson is the daughter of the late David Allaband, who worked on the river as a longshoreman and aboard tugs beginning at the age of 12 in the mid 1920s. I've set up a page about his life and times, which you might find interesting. Included are images of the tugboat Rancocas, and another that I have not identified.

Please write with any comments!

Phil Cohen
Pennsauken NJ
July 28, 2007

Marie Gibbs Johnson sent some newspaper clippings with pictures of Cooper's Point and of Smith's Island and Windmill Island, both of which were in the Delaware between Camden and Philadelphia and which were removed to allow the navigation of the river by larger ships. Both islands were popular entertainment centers in their time. 

Phil Cohen
Camden NJ
Pennsauken NJ
October 12, 2007

Warren Fairess sent three photos taken in 1929 from the Benjamin Franklin Bridge and Dave Boone sent three photos and some text pages about the South Jersey Port in Camden from 1931.... on the same day in July! It just goes to show, great minds think alike!

Phil Cohen
Pennsauken NJ
July 20, 2007

Bob Bartosz made available 8 photos from August of 1929 taken in the area of the Market Street Ferry Terminal, one in particular is a close shot of one of the shops that located on what was called 
Ferry Walk". Today I think I'm going to try and get my act together and get the rest of these photos... or a lot of them anyway... formatted! 

Phil Cohen
Pennsauken NJ
September 19, 2009

Jim Lapp sent a number of photos taken in 1981 of tugboats belonging to the Curtis Bay Towing company. The photos were all taken in August 1981 from Pier 5 North Delaware Ave looking towards Camden. 

Phil Cohen
Pennsauken NJ
January 30, 2010

Sailing Ships docked off of Cooper Point -1890s

Click on Image to Enlarge

Windmill Island

Smith's Island

The amusement park and beer garden on Smith's Island attracted thousands of pleasure seekers before the Federal government removed the island in the 1890s. Legend has it that a ship sank on the spot and the island was created from river silt piling upon it. The view below was from the old Federal Street ferry house.

August 1929 - Photos of and from the Market Street Ferry Terminal

Taken from the roof of the Ferry Terminal, looking northwest
Click on Imags to Enlarge

Taken from the roof of the Ferry Terminal, looking northwest
Click on Images to Enlarge

Taken from the roof of the Ferry Terminal, looking southeast towards Federal Street. The buildings to the center and left rear belong to the J.B. Van Sciver furniture company, at the corner of Federal Street and Delaware Avenue. The trolley car is bound for Haddon Heights.

Click on Images to Enlarge

Taken from the roof of the Ferry Terminal, looking northeast towards Market Street. The building at the left rear is the Victor Talking Machine Company building, which in recent times was converted into an apartment building after having stood empty for decades. Coomercial traffice that came across on the Ferry took this short road which led to the corner of Delaware Avenue and Market Street. Billboard at right rear advertises the Grand Street Follies, a vaudeville show that was then playing in Philadelphia. 

Click on Images to Enlarge

Left: Unidentified man standing in front of shops that were in the Ferry Terminal. Shop on left is a candy store then owned by J. Frank Shelleberger, on the right is the Terminal Delicatessen at 21 Market Street. 
Be sure to view the enlarged version of the picture at left, which is in great detail.

Click on Images to Enlarge

Cramer Hill & North Camden

An abandoned wreck

Click on Image to Enlarge

ACTIVE
a tugboat belonging to
Express Marine

Click on Image to Enlarge

ALERT
a tugboat belonging to
Express Marine

Click on Image to Enlarge

ALERT
a tugboat belonging to
Express Marine

Click on Image to Enlarge

ANNE
a tugboat belonging to
Express Marine

1971

RCA factory buildings then still standing are at rear of photo

Click on Image to Enlarge

GRACE ANN
A
BANKS TUGBOAT, AT FAR RIGHT

Click on Image to Enlarge

GRACE ANN
A
BANKS TUGBOAT

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

GRACE ANN
A
BANKS TUGBOAT

Click on Image to Enlarge

GRACE ANN
A
BANKS TUGBOAT

Click on Image to Enlarge

JOHN B. REYBURN
A
BANKS TUGBOAT

Click on Image to Enlarge

JOHN B. REYBURN
A
BANKS TUGBOAT

Click on Image to Enlarge

JOHN B. REYBURN
A
BANKS TUGBOAT

Click on Image to Enlarge

JOHN B. REYBURN
A
BANKS TUGBOAT

Click on Image to Enlarge

RABCO
A
BANKS TUGBOAT

Click on Image to Enlarge

BANKS TUGBOATS

UNKNOWN, UNKNOWN, &  R.A. BANKS

Click on Image to Enlarge

BANKS TUGBOATS

Click on Image to Enlarge

BANKS TUGBOATS

Click on Image to Enlarge

Abandoned barges 
and tugboats in Cramer Hill

Click on Image to Enlarge

Abandoned barges 
and tugboats in Cramer Hill

Click on Image to Enlarge

Abandoned barges 
and tugboats in Cramer Hill

Click on Image to Enlarge

Abandoned barges 
and tugboats in Cramer Hill

Click on Image to Enlarge

Abandoned barges 
and tugboats in Cramer Hill

Click on Image to Enlarge

Abandoned barges 
and tugboats in Cramer Hill

Click on Image to Enlarge

Abandoned barges 
and tugboats in Cramer Hill

Click on Image to Enlarge

Abandoned barges 
and tugboats in Cramer Hill

Click on Image to Enlarge

Abandoned barges 
and tugboats in Cramer Hill

Click on Image to Enlarge

Abandoned barges 
and tugboats in Cramer Hill

Click on Image to Enlarge

Abandoned barges 
and tugboats in Cramer Hill

Click on Image to Enlarge

Abandoned barges 
and tugboats in Cramer Hill

Click on Image to Enlarge

Abandoned barges 
and tugboats in Cramer Hill

Click on Image to Enlarge

Abandoned barges 
and tugboats in Cramer Hill

Click on Image to Enlarge

Abandoned barges 
and tugboats in Cramer Hill

Click on Image to Enlarge

Cramer Hill & North Camden

ACTIVE

Click on Image to Enlarge

ALERT

Click on Image to Enlarge

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

ELLA
AT
CAMDEN SHIP REPAIR

Click on Image to Enlarge

CRAMER HILL WRECK

Click on Image to Enlarge

CRAMER HILL WRECK

Click on Image to Enlarge

CRESCO

Click on Image to Enlarge

CRESCO
July 13, 1967

Click on Image to Enlarge

FARRAGUT YACHT CLUB

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

Oil Storage Tanks
at the mouth of the
Cooper River

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

Oil Storage Tanks
at the mouth of the
Cooper River

The old City Incinerator is at right

Click on Image to Enlarge

The Harrison Avenue Dump

Click on Image to Enlarge

The enlarged view is HUGE. You get a clear view of North 10th Street in North Camden, The Sears Building, and Ablett Village, among other things. 

 

GERTRUDE SHAW
1935

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

GERTRUDE SHAW

ABANDONED
1960s

Click on Image to Enlarge

GUARDIAN
AN
EXPRESS MARINE
TUGBOAT

Click on Image to Enlarge

PENNSBURY
a tugboat belonging to
Express Marine

Click on Image for Supersized Enlargement

CRAMER HILL WRECK

Click on Image to Enlarge

CRAMER HILL WRECK

Click on Image to Enlarge

CRAMER HILL WRECK

Click on Image to Enlarge

CRAMER HILL WRECK

Click on Image to Enlarge

L.B. SHAW
TUGBOATS
SEPTEMBER 1940

CHARLES M. SHAW AT LEFT

Click on Image to Enlarge

MARGARET
A
TUCKER TUGBOAT

Click on Image to Enlarge

PHYLLIS
a tugboat belonging to Tucker

Click on Image for Supersized Enlargement

 

ROSE
a tugboat belonging to Tucker,
at Camden Ship Repair

Click on Images to Enlarge

 

ROSE
a tugboat belonging to Tucker

Click on Image for Supersized Enlargement

 

ROSE
a tugboat belonging to Tucker

Click on Image for Supersized Enlargement

 

RUBY M

Click on Images to Enlarge

 
RUSSELL B. MURRAY
a tugboat belonging to
Express Marine

Click on Image for Supersized Enlargement

SHAMOKIN
a tugboat belonging to
Express Marine

Click on Image for Supersized Enlargement

 
Cramer Hill Tugs
1923

Click on Images to Enlarge

 

John H. Mathis & Company Ship Yard

About 1906

Click on Image to Enlarge

Click on Image to Enlarge

Motor Boating Magazine
January, 1924
Advertisement

Click on Image to Enlarge

About 1906

Click on Image to Enlarge

John H. Mathis
Company
Shipyard

 

Click on Images to Enlarge

North Camden & Cramer Hill

North Camden
Late 1920s
East of North 7th Street

Click on Images to Enlarge

North Camden
Late 1920s
Former Vine Street Ferry terminal
and
Main Street railroad terminus

Click on Images to Enlarge

North Camden
Late 1920s
Shipyards & Piers

Click on Images to Enlarge

North Camden
Late 1920s
Shipyards & Piers
John R. Evans leather factory
at top of photo

Click on Images to Enlarge

North Camden
Late 1920s
Shipyards & Piers
John R. Evans leather factory
Milton Street is at top center of photo

Click on Images to Enlarge

Click on Images to Enlarge
North Camden
Knox Gelatin & Pyne Point Park
Late 1920s

Click on Images to Enlarge

 
North Camden
Late 1920s
Shipyards & Piers

Click on Images to Enlarge

North Camden
Pyne Point
Late 1920s
Shipyards & Piers

Click on Images to Enlarge

North Camden
Pyne Point
Late 1920s
Shipyards & Piers

Click on Images to Enlarge

PYNE POINT BOAT YARD
1932

Click on Image for Supersized Enlargement

PYNE POINT BOAT YARD

Click on Image for Supersized Enlargement

The Camden Motor Boat Club
Pyne Point
Camden, N.J.

circa 1910

Click on Image for Supersized Enlargement

North Camden
East of North 2nd Street
Late 1920s
Shipyards & Piers

Click on Images to Enlarge

 
North Camden
East of North 2nd Street
Late 1920s
Shipyards & Piers

Click on Images to Enlarge

North Camden
East of North 2nd Street
Late 1920s
Shipyards & Piers

Click on Images to Enlarge

North Camden
East of North 2nd Street
Late 1920s
Shipyards & Piers

Click on Images to Enlarge

PENN-JERSEY
SHIPBUILDING CORPORATION

Click on Image for Supersized Enlargement

PETTY'S ISLAND
Looking West
from
Cramer Hill

Click on Image for Supersized Enlargement

TIDEWATER SHIPYARD
&
Cramer Hill

Click on Image for Supersized Enlargement

500 Block of Vine Street
circa 1900

Click on Image for Supersized Enlargement

Petty's Island

PETTY'S ISLAND
Looking South
towards
North Camden
&
the
Benjamin Franklin Bridge

Click on Image for Supersized Enlargement

PETTY'S ISLAND
Looking West
from
Cramer Hill

Click on Image for Supersized Enlargement

 

Piers & Ferries

Estonian freighter KOTKAS
June 14, 1940

Built in 1919 as Norwegian  War Timiskaming, then became French Oise 1919 (Cie Generale Transatlantique, St.Nazaire), Estonian Kotkas 1929 (Kronstrom & Kowamees, Tallinn, Estonia), Panamanian Farida 1941, Panamanian Nidaros 1946, Norwegian Nidaros 1946 (Rederi A/S Nidaros, Oslo), Chinese Kien Yuan 1948 (Kien Yuan SS Co, Shanghai). Her fate is given as "sunk, January 27, 1949, in collision with str. Tai Ping, both vessels sinking, off Wenchow, in position 30 degrees 37N x 112 degrees 25E. Vessel bound from Keelung for Shanghai with coal."

Camden Marine Terminal
advertised in
The Traffic World
April 2, 1932

Click on Image to Enlarge

 
City of Camden
advertising it's Port District
1931

Click on Image to Enlarge

Roy R. Stewart

Harold W. Bennett

Dr. David S. Rhone

Frank B. Hanna

Clay W. Reesman

American Dredging Company
at the foot of Division Street
1930s

Click on Image to Enlarge

ASHKABAD in Camden NJ - October 25, 1933

Click on Image to Enlarge

Ashkabad
October 25, 1933

A Russian freighter converted into a tanker, the Ashkabad was torpedoed off the coast of North Carolina by U-402

The Ashkhabad had several previous names such as, the Dneprostroi, the Kutais, the Mistley Hall, the Aldersgate, the Milazzo, and the War Hostage. She was originally constructed as a freighter, but was converted to a tanker to carry fuel oil. The ship had a crew of 47, three of which were women. On April 26, 1942, the Ashkhabad left New York on her way to Cuba. The night sky on April 29, 1942 was clear and had a full moon that allowed six miles of visibility. The HMS Lady Elsa was escorting the Ashkhabad on her journey. In accordance to Navy regulations, both ships were zigzagging.

At 9:50, the HMS Lady Elsa spotted a U-Boat that was 500 yards off the starboard side of the Ashkhabad. None of the crew on watch aboard the Ashkhabad saw the U-Boat. The HMS Lady Elsa fired one shot that caused the U-402 to dive for cover, but not before firing a single torpedo. The torpedo hit on the starboard side just below the waterline in the No. 4 hold. The No. 4 hold, the deep tank, and the engine room flooded. Even though the Ashkhabad didn't have any watertight doors, only the stern of the ship flooded.

The U-402 partially surfaced about 500 yards off of the starboard side of the ship. The crew of the Ashkhabad, fired three shots from the forward .30-caliber gun, but all three missed. An hour after the attack, Captain Alexy Pavlovitch put all of his code books in a weighted box and sank them. Then he gave the order to abandon ship. The HMS Lady Elsa picked up all of the crew and took them to Morehead City.

At 10:00 a.m. the next morning, the crew from the HMS Hertfordshire, a British armed trawler, boarded the Ashkhabad and "salvaged" valuable navigational equipment and clothes. At 3:00 p.m., Captain Pavlovitch, some of the crew, and a Fifth Naval District Intelligence Officer returned to the Ashkhabad to find that it had been looted. The HMS Hertfordshire had already left the area.

The next day the Russians returned to their ship again and this time they were early enough to catch the HMS Hertfordshire tied up to the Ashkhabad. The British were removing all of the loose items from the ship. They were told that she was not abandoned and salvage tugs were on the way and the British returned all of the items that they had taken.

On May 3, 1942, the USS Semmes, a destroyer, came upon the Ashkhabad and determined that she was abandoned and a navigational hazard and fired three rounds from her 3-inch guns. The hits caused the midship superstructure to catch fire. Seeing the fire, the HMS St. Zeno went to the Ashkhabad. The HMS St. Zeno fired a shot at the Ashkhabad, under the authorization of the commanding officer of the HMS Hertfordshire, who was in command of all British armed trawlers at Morehead City. His explanation was that he thought the HMS St. Zeno might sink the Ashkhabad and extinguish the fire, which he considered a menace to a large convoy expected in the vicinity.

When the Navy tug, Relief, arrived to tow the Ashkhabad to shore for salvage, the ship was already a total loss. In 1943 and 1944, the Ashkhabad was blasted with explosives because it was a navigational hazard.

The Ashkhabad now lies in 55 feet of water, about 22 miles southeast of the Beaufort Inlet. The high parts of this wreck are the boilers and the condenser. Some of the ribs of the ship can also be seen in the section fore of the boilers. Deck plates and twisted beams are scattered about the wreck.

U-402 was sunk 13 Oct, 1943 in the middle of the North Atlantic, in position 48.56N, 29.41W, by an acoustic torpedo (Fido) from Avenger and Wildcat aircraft (VC-9) of the American escort carrier USS Card. 50 dead (all hands lost).

ATLANTIC
May 13, 1934

Click on Image to Enlarge

AUGUSTA
May 13, 1938

Click on Image to Enlarge

AUGVALD
July 16, 1939

Click on Image to Enlarge

Delivered in November 1920 from A. McMillan & Co. Ltd., Dumbarton as Torrey for A/S To (Martin Mosvold), Kristiansand. Martin Mosvold encountered economical difficulties and the ship was taken over in 1922 by A. I. Langfeldt, Kristiansand. Purchased by H. M. Wrangell & Co. A/S in June-1923 and registered as Augvald for D/S A/S Augvald. Transferred to Skibs-A/S Corona (same managers) in November, of 1929.

This ship, like many other Norwegian vessels, got caught up in the Spanish Civil War when she was stopped in the straits of Gibraltar by Franco's navy and forced to a Spanish port in April 1937, but was later freed.

On March 2, 1941, at 2212, Augvald, under the command of Captain Rolf Svenson, which had lost sight of Convoy HX-109 in bad weather the day before, was hit by a torpedo from U-147, commnaded by  Korvettenkapitän Reinhard Hardegen, and sank. 29 men died, among them two young English boys age 14 and 16. Able seaman Rasmus Kolstř survived 11 days alone on the sea and was picked up by the British corvette HMS Pimpernel about 150 miles NW of Loch Ewe. U-147 was in turn sunk on June 2, 1941 north-west of Ireland, in position 56.38N, 10.24W, by depth charges from the British destroyer HMS Wanderer and the British corvette HMS Periwinkle. 26 dead (all hands lost).


BARRWHIN

Top: Camden, NJ - February 5, 1939

Click on Image to Enlarge

At Built in 1929, at the Greenock Dockyard Co Ltd, Greenock.  the Barrwhin was a 4,998 ton freighter. She was carrying 8200 tons of grain and military stores from Halifax to London as part of Convoy HX-212

At 21.18 hours on October 29, 1942, the Barrwhin (Master Thomas Sydney Dixon) in convoy HX-212 was hit by one torpedo from U-436 and sank quickly south of Iceland at 55.02N, 22.45W - Grid AL 5482. The Barrwhin had rescued 60 survivors from the Kosmos II, which had been sunk by U-624 (Soden-Fraunhofen) at 03.05 hours the same day. 12 crew members and 12 survivors were lost.

The master, 41 crew members and 48 survivors were picked up after about eight hours from rafts by the HMCS Kenogami (K 125) (Lt P.J.B. Cook) and landed at Londonderry.

U-436, captained by Kapitänleutnant Günther Seibicke was sunk 26 May, 1943 in the North Atlantic west of Cape Ortegal, Spain, in position 43.49N, 15.56W, by depth charges from the British frigate HMS Test and the British corvette HMS Hyderabad 47 dead (all hands lost).

BERING
Tugboat in the foreground

Click on Image to Enlarge


Code letters: GLNXOfficial Number: 148875
Rigging: steel single screw steamer; 1 deck; 6 cemented bulkheads; fitted with direction finder & echo sounding device; cellular double bottom 297 feet, 954 tons; Forward Peak Tank 86 tons; Aft Peak Tank 195 tons
Tonnage: 3,319 tons gross, 3,026 under deck and 2,005 net
Dimensions: 340.1 feet long, 48.7 foot beam and holds 22.5 feet deep; Poop 29 feet; Bridge 104 feet; Forecastle 34 feet
Constructrion: 1925, Napier & Miller Ltd., Glasgow
Propulsion: triple expansion engine with 3 cylinders of 22, 35 1/2 & 60 inches diameter respectively; stroke 39 inches; 298 nominal horsepower;
2 single ended boilers; 6 corrugated furnaces; grate surface 123 sq. ft.; heating surface 5,126 sq. ft.; engine by D. Rowan & Co. Ltd. in Glasgow
Owners: Nisbet Shipping Co. Ltd. (G. Nisbet & Co., managers) Port of registry: Glasgow
BLAIRATHOLL
in Camden
March 22, 1933

On November 16, 1941 a convoy of steamers BLAIRATHOLL (3319grt), BARON NEWLANDS (3386grt), SHUNA (1575grt), CISNEROS (1886grt), and OTTINGE (2870grt), and oiler BROWN RANGER departed Gibraltar escorted by destroyer HMS WILD SWAN, sloop HMS DEPTFORD, and corvettes HMS CONVOLVULUS, HMS RHODODENDRON, and HMS MARIGOLD

The convoy, Operation CHIEFTAN, was a diversion for Operation CRUSADER in the eastern Mediterranean . A U-boat contact was made by destroyer WILD SWAN on the 16th. The destroyer was joined by corvette HMS SAMPHIRE. Corvette MARIGOLD sank the U-433 south of Malaga in 36-13N, 04-42W. Six officers and thirty two ratings the submarine were rescued. Six ratings were lost in the submarine. The convoy proceeded towards Malta , but after nightfall on the 18th, the steamers returned to Gibraltar .

Blairatholl had arrived at New York from Partington on October 26, 1942 and left New York as part of Convoy SC-110 on November 17 for Loch Ewe and Tyne. After joining Convoy HX-216, at 20:51 on November 26, 1942 Blairatholl reported by W.T. that is was in collision. At 05:14 on the 27th reported foundering 51 25N 48 30W. Blairatholl had collided with the Norwegian freighter John Bakke. The following Royal Navy personnel were lost: 

PATTISON, Harry, Act/Able Seaman 
QUINAN, Edward J, Act/Able Seaman 
STEELE, William, Act/Able Seaman 

SS COMMERCIAL BOSTONIAN
in Camden

A 2,730 ton freighter, this ship was built in 1919 as the American Lake Elkwater for US Shipping Board of Washington DC. In 1929 she was sold to Mooremack Gulf Lines, New York and renamed Commercial Bostonian. In 1940 sold to Lloyd Brasilieiro of Rio de Janeiro Brazil and renamed Ozório.

On 8 Jun, 1942, the Ozório rescued eleven survivors from a lifeboat of Robin Moor in 00°16N/37°37W and landed them at Recife, Brazil. 

At 01.10 hours on 28 Sep, 1942, U-514, under the command of Kapitänleutnant Hans Jürgen Auffermann attacked a small convoy consisting of two merchant ships escorted by USS Roe (DD 418) off the Amazon estuary about 75 miles north of Salinas and sank the Ozório in shallow waters. At 02.15 hours, the U-boat fired a torpedo at the second ship, the Lages, which also sank in shallow waters with only the bow visible in 00°12N/47°55W.

The unarmed Ozório (Master Almiro Galdino de Carvalho) sank 25 minutes after being hit. The master and four crew members were lost.

Both vessels were sunk in shallow waters and later salvaged, but not repaired until the war ended, thus regarded as total losses. 

U-514 was sunk 8 July, 1943 north-east of Cape Finisterre, Spain, in position 43.37N, 08.59W, by rockets from a British Liberator aircraft (Sqdn. 224/R). 54 dead (all hands lost).

M/S CONCORDIA TADJ
in Camden

late 1950s - 1960s

 
SS COPAN
in Camden

The SS Copan was owned by the United Fruit Company and was used to bring produce from Central America to the United States. Still plying the seas as late as 1963, the Copan was one of eight ships whose use was donated by the American Steamship Line to help evacuate survivors of the Bay of Pigs Invasion. The evacaution was completed between Christmas Day 1962 and July 4, 1963.

 
 

D/S RAVNEFJELL
top- in Camden August 31, 1937
renamed later that year
as D/S Far bottom- in Boston, 1938

Click on Image to Enlarge

Owner: Skibs-A/S Skibsfart & Skibs-A/S Salvesen
Manager: Jacob Salvesen, Farsund
Tonnage:
2475 gt, 1420 net, 4120 tdwt.
Dimensions: 295.5' x 43.7' x 20.6'.
Machinery: Triple exp. (G. T. Gray & Co., South Shields), 232 nhp.

Built in 1921 (R. W. Jordan says she was started by Newcastle Shipbuilding Co. Ltd. and completed by Forth Shipbuilding & Engineering Co. Ltd. in 1921, while a Norwegian source states she was completed by Pusnes Střberi & mek. Verksted, Arendal and delivered in Oct.-1922). Delivered as Ravnefjell to A/S Rudolf (Olsen & Ugelstad), Oslo. Sold in Sept.-1937 to Skibs-A/S Skibsfart & Skibs-A/S Salvesen (Jacob Salvesen), Farsund and renamed Far.

Captain: Sverre Jakobsen (from 1938 til Dec.-1945).

1st Mate was Reimert Pedersen (from 1938 till 1944), 3rd Mate was Aage Simonsen (from the fall of 1943 until the end of the war, had previously served on M/T Sommerstad and M/S Tigre), Chief Engineer Severin Andreassen (also from 1938 till Dec.-1945). She also had a donkeyman named Ole Johan Nilsen.

Far was in service U.S.A.-England in the period 1941-1943, then in the Mediterranean.

She was scheduled for the slow Sydney [C.B.]-U.K. Convoy SC 54 in Nov.-1941 but instead joined SC 55, pulp wood for Manchester.

She's also listed in Convoy SC 76 from Halifax to the U.K. in March-1942, cargo of phosphates for Ipswich. Early in Aug. that year we find her in the slow Halifax-U.K. Convoy SC 95, cargo of lumber for London, joining with the Sydney, C.B. portion of the convoy. The following month she's listed in station 32 of the westbound North Atlantic Convoy ON 128.

A year later (Sept.-1943) she's listed in station 55 of the slow Halifax-U.K. Convoy SC 141. In Nov.-1943 she shows up in Convoy OS 58/KMS 32 (see external link below), voyaging from Oban to Sicily with coal in station 23. KMS 32 will be added to my own site in due course.

In Jan.-1944 we find her in the Bizerta portion of Convoy MKS 36.

She was loading ammunition at Barletta, Italy in May-1944 when an explosion occurred in one of the cases of ammunition, but the crew, lead by the captain, the 1st and 3rd mates as well as a British lieutenant Terry were able to extinguish the resulting fire before further explosions occurred, thereby saving not only the ship, but the city from destruction. 2 other ships with the same kind of cargo were right behind Far, so the situation was quite dramatic for a while. The ruined cargo was then unloaded and new ammunition taken on board, before she continued to Ancona, which was in ruins at the time. After having unloaded there for 2 days she moved further out, and shortly afterwards a diver found a magnetic mine in the spot were Far had been discharging her cargo.

According to an article I have found, Far was at Bari in the fall of 1944(?) unloading (loading?) ammunition. A Liberty ship was next to her unloading bombs. Far missed the convoy she was scheduled to leave with, but the captain decided to try to catch up with it instead of waiting for the next convoy. About 4 n. miles out she was shaken by an enormous explosion occurring in Bari harbour; those who were below decks thought they had had an explosion on board. It turned out the Liberty ship had exploded, with the loss of her 80 crew as well as several hundred other lives, and again Far had narrowly avoided disaster. I'm a little suspicious here and wonder if the dates and events have become somewhat confused, so that what happend at Bari during the aircraft attack in Dec.-1943 when the Liberty ship S/S John Harvey blew up (see my text for Bollsta), has been mixed with the events of the spring of 1945 when the ammunition ship S/S Charles Henderson exploded during the unloading of cargo (D/S Knoll was set on fire at that time, follow link for more). I don't know enough about the Liberty ships to confirm whether a separate incident did occur at Bari in the fall of 1944, as stated in this article.

Far continued in the supply service in the Mediterranean until Nov.-1945. She ran aground on January 8, 1950, off Flekkefjord, and broke up during a storm, when on a voyage from the Tyne to Copenhagen. No casualties.

SS IDERWALD
in Camden August 31, 1937
Click on Image to Enlarge

Built in 1923 and operated by the Hamburg-
America Line, Iderwald was a 5033 ton German owned passenger-cargo ship. She had been in port at Tampico, Mexico at the outbreak of hostilities. 

 Idarwald was intercepted by the British light cruiser HMS Diomede on December 8, 1940. The United States Navy destroyer Sturtevant DD-240 stood by and did not interfere or take part in the operation, as the U.S. was not then at war. Before a capture could be effected the crew of the German freighter set it afire and scuttled it off Cabo Corrientes, Cuba.

IVAN GORTHON
in Camden

Click on Image to Enlarge

Tug
C.W. Anderson

Click on Image to Enlarge

 
Site of the old
Reading Ferry Terminal

Click on Image to Enlarge

Tug
Frank H. Caven

Click on Image to Enlarge

July 2, 1960

Click on Image to Enlarge

Greenville Kane

Click on Image to Enlarge

Liberty
November 26, 1960

Click on Image to Enlarge

 
LULEA
in Camden August 25, 1933
Click on Image to Enlarge

This Swedish-owned and operated freighter was built in Germany around 1924. She was lost on July 11, 1942 near the Vastervik Archipelago, Sweden when torpedoed by the Russian submarine S-7. Eight lives were lost. The S-7 was later torpedoed herself by a Finnish submarine.

MEDICEO
in Camden January 23, 1940
Click on Image to Enlarge

The Mediceo was built in Glasgow in 1918 as the War Singer for the Anglo-Saxon Petroleum Company. In 1921 the ship was renamed Akera. The ship was sold in 1927 to Prebensen & Blakstad, Risřr, Norway. 

In 1939 the ship again changed hands. Sold to Ditta Marino Querci, of Genoa, Italy, she was converted to cargo ship and renamed Mediceo and placed under the Italian flag. When Italy surrendered to the Allies in September of 1943, Mediceo was seized by Germans and handed over to Mittelmeer Reederei GmbH. She was bombed by British aircraft January 31, 1945 and sunk off Tagliamento, Italy.

MERISAAR

Top: Camden, March 20, 1940

Click on Image to Enlarge

 
NIDO

Top: Camden, August 23, 1966

Click on Image to Enlarge

 
PAN AMERICAN

Top: Camden, January 16, 1934

Click on Image to Enlarge


TISAREN

Top: Camden, September 18, 1934
Click on Image to Enlarge

The Swedish motor-ship Tisnaren of 5,747 tons was built by the shipyards "Götaverken A/B of Gothenburg" in Sweden in 1918. Tisnaren belonged to the shipping company "Transatlantic Rederiaktiebolaget".

Besides calling at Camden in 1934, Tisnaren visited Auckland, New Zealand two times between December 17, 1930 and December 20, 1931, and also called at South African ports during its active career.

On October 15, 1937 Tisnaren sailed with cargo and passenngers from Oslo, Norway to Cape Town, South Africa, Arriving in Mid November. In the latter half of 1938, Tisnaren sailed from Vancouver, Canada to Brisbane, Australia, calling at San Francisco, Sydney, Melbourne, and Adelaide.

On October 3, 1941 Tisnaren saved from Oban to Freetown in West Africa as part of Convoy OS-8, arriving on October 26, 1941 without incident. Tisnaren went on from there to Cape Town, Bombay, and Karachi. 

On March 14, 1942 Tisnaren sailed from Free Town, bound for Gibralter and Clyde, Scotland as part of Convoy SL-103. She made Gibralter on March 22, and arrived in Liverpool on Aril 2, 1942, before proceeding to Clyde. Tisnaren's next journey proved to her her last. 

On May 2, 1942, Tisnaren salied from Liverpool as part of Convoy OS-27, bound for Rio de Janiero. On May 19th, 1942 the Italian submarine Cappellini, operating out of the wartime naval base at Bordeaux, France, located Tisnaren, which had become separated from the of convoy  and sank it. The position of the attack was given at 03° 38' to N 32° 01' W, while the ship sank in position 03 N 33 W; there were no casualties and the 40 crewmembers were later rescued. 

"My father John Arnold Smith from Manchester was on the Tisnaren when it was torpedoed. The ship was sailing from Manchester to South America with a cargo of Scotch Whiskey. He and other crew members were adrift in an open life boat for 2 days before being rescued by the United States vessel S.S. Black Hawk. They were then taken to Port of Spain, Trinidad to recover. My father told me that after being torpedoed, the attacking submarine surfaced and started to fire machine guns towards the sinking Tisnaren. My father served on British and American vessels in many theatres of war between 1941 and 1945. The Tirnaren was the only neutral ship he sailed on in this period. Apparently when attacked, she was floodlit with a large Swedish flag painted on both port and starboard signs to indicate her neutrality. It was believed an Italian Submarine carried out the attack.

John Smith,  February 20, 2005

VIGOR
Camden, June 19, 1933

Click on Image to Enlarge

VIGOR
Camden, June 19, 1933

Click on Image to Enlarge

YIANNIS

Camden, December 12, 1939

Click on Image to Enlarge

Piers & Ferries - Beckett Street Terminal

Beckett Street Terminal
1930s

Click on Image for Supersized Enlargement

A Luckenbach freighter
at the
Beckett Street Terminal
July 24, 1933

Click on Image to Enlarge

SS Lillian Luckenbach
Beckett Street Terminal
July 14, 1933

Originally built as USAT Marica was built at Chester, Pennsylvania, as an 8738 gross ton freighter for the Luckenbach Steamship Company of New York. Upon completion she was taken over by the Navy, converted to a transport, and placed in commission in June 1919 as USS Marica (ID # 4031). Following a few months' service returning U.S. service personnel from Europe, in mid-September 1919 she was decommissioned and turned over to the War Department for operation as the U.S. Army Transport Marica. She was soon returned to her owner, which reconverted her to a freighter and at some point renamed her Lillian Luckenbach. The ship's long commercial service lasted until 27 March 1943, when she was sunk off the U.S. East Coast in a collision with the S.S. Cape Henlopen.

Click on Image to Enlarge

Click on Image to Enlarge
Click on Image to Enlarge
Click on Image to Enlarge
Click on Image to Enlarge
Date
Vessel
#
Vessel
Name
Vessel
Owner
Call Ltrs
Home
Port
Flag
1921
221643
Chattanooga City U.S. Steel Products Co.
New York
MDFN
New York US
1930
221643
Chattanooga City May: Isthmian Lines, Inc.
New York
MDFN
New York US
1933
221643
Chattanooga City Isthmian Lines, Inc.
New York
KDUW
New York US

SS Chattanooga City
(
Isthmian Steamship Line)
at the
Beckett Street Terminal

2/22/1943 - The vessel sailed from Liverpool, UK to New York, carrying 3,500 tons sand ballast, Robert C. Forbes Master, as part of Convoy ON-166. At 7:20 PM, position 46.54 N, 34.30 W, East of St, John's Newfoundland, while steaming at 9.5 knots, the U-606 (Dohler) fired a torpedo, striking the ship in the center of #4 hold. The explosion lifted the vessel out of the water, blew the hatch covers of #3 and #4 holds, tore the deck booms away and probably severed the main shaft. The ship quickly listed to starboard and settled rapidly. Just 2 minutes after the explosion the Master ordered the ship abandoned, with water reaching the welldeck 1 minute later. The vessel sank by the stern in about 15 minutes. The 10 officers, 27 crewmen and 21 armed guards left the ship in 4 boats and 1 raft. The Canadian Corvette TRILLIUM (K-172) rescued the survivors 3 hours later. Ten of the gun crew transferred to the USCG SPENCER (WPG-36) landing in Argentia, Newfoundland, the rest landing at St. Johns. All hands survived the attack.

"At 2120 there was a tremendous explosion at number four hold on the starboard side. It seemed to lift the ship out of the water; blew off all the hatch covers of number three and number four holds. The shaft was broken. There was nothing to do but abandon ship."

"Heroes in Dungarees", page 116

Within a few hours the U-606 herself was sunk by the Polish destroyer ORP Burza and an American Coast Guard cutter, USCG Campbell.

Click on Image to Enlarge

Beckett Street Terminal

Click on Image to Enlarge

Beckett Street Terminal

Click on Image to Enlarge

Benjamin Franklin Bridge

 


Benjamin Franklin Bridge - 1929
Photos courtesy of Warren Fairess from the collection of his mother, Marie Fisbeck Fairess

This shows Campbell's tomato processor along the River, they received a good deal of their fresh tomatoes via barge and small freighters from NJ and Delaware farmers.  The ship (below) anchored in the stream is a suction dredge, she shows up often in other photos of this area and this must have been her "spot" when not dredging." 

- Dave Boone, July 2008

Click on Images to Enlarge

Ferries

BRIDGETON

Click on Image to Enlarge

BRIDGETON

Click on Image to Enlarge

City of Camden

Click on Image to Enlarge

City of Camden

Click on Image to Enlarge

City of Camden

Click on Image to Enlarge

City of Reading

Click on Image to Enlarge

City of WIlmington

Click on Image to Enlarge

Vine Street Ferry

Click on Image to Enlarge

Federal Street Ferry
1890s

Click on Image to Enlarge

The West Jersey Ferry

circa 1895

Captain John G. Hutchison was superintendent of the ferry for over 30 years, beginning in 1857.

Click on Image to Enlarge

Click Here to Supersize

The Arctic

built in 1879 for
The West Jersey Ferry

Click on Image to Enlarge

Click Here to Supersize

The West Jersey Ferry

Click on Image to Enlarge

CHESTER

Click on Image to Enlarge

CHESTER

Click on Image to Enlarge

BRIDGETON
Crossing the Delaware

Click on Image to Enlarge

After the Fire
at the
Market Street Ferry

February 18, 1958

Click on Image to Enlarge

HADDONFIELD
Click on Image to Enlarge

HADDONFIELD
Click on Image to Enlarge

HAMMONTON
Click on Image to Enlarge

Market Street Ferry Terminal
circa 1906

Click on Image to Enlarge

MILLVILLE
Click on Image to Enlarge

MILLVILLE
Click on Image to Enlarge

MILLVILLE
Click on Image to Enlarge

MILLVILLE
Click on Image to Enlarge

SALEM
Click on Image to Enlarge

Kaighn's Point Ferry Terminal
circa 1905

Click on Image to Enlarge

Kaighn's Point Ferry Terminal
circa 1900
Click on Image to Enlarge

Kaighn's Point Ferry Terminal
after it burned down
Click on Image to Enlarge

Kaighn's Point Ferry Terminal
circa 1900
Click on Image to Enlarge

Reading Railroad
Kaighn's Point Ferry Terminal
1923
Click on Image to Enlarge

Reading Railroad
Kaighn's Point Ferry Terminal
1923
Click on Image to Enlarge

Kaighn's Point Ferry Terminal
Click on Image to Enlarge

Kaighn's Point Ferry Terminal
Click on Image to Enlarge

LENAPE
Click on Image to Enlarge

MILLVILLE
Click on Image to Enlarge

MILLVILLE
Click on Image to Enlarge

Market Street Ferry
under construction - 1900

Click on Image to Enlarge

Reading Railroad
Kaighn's Point Ferry Terminal
1923
Click on Image to Enlarge

Pennsylvania Railroad Ferry
SALEM
1949

Click on Image to Enlarge

Pennsylvania Railroad Ferry
VENTNOR
October 18, 1938

Click on Image to Enlarge

Camden

Pennsylvania Railroad
Ferry Terminal
circa 1929

Click on Image to Enlarge

Pennsylvania Railroad
rail yard
just south of Ferry Terminal
circa 1929

Click on Image to Enlarge

Delaware River Bridge
now known as the
Ben Franklin Bridge
circa 1929

Click on Image to Enlarge

Camden
south of the Ben Franklin Bridge
circa 1929

Click on Image to Enlarge

Camden Waterfront
south of the Ferry Terminal
circa 1929

Pennsylvania Railroad
roundhouse is at lower left

Click on Image to Enlarge

Camden Waterfront
south of Spruce Street
circa 1929

Reading Railroad Ferry Terminal
is at lower right

Click on Image to Enlarge

Click on Image to Enlarge

Click on Image to Enlarge

Click on Image to Enlarge

Click on Image to Enlarge

Click on Image to Enlarge

Campbell Soup
along the den Waterfront

Click on Image to Enlarge

Farnham Park
1910

Click on Image to Enlarge

Market Street
East From North Third Street

Click on Image to Enlarge

Camden Waterfront
as seen from City Hall
1930s

Click on Image to Enlarge

Camden Waterfront
1931

Click on Image to Enlarge

Camden Waterfront
1932

Click on Image to Enlarge

Tug
ADRIATIC
and the
Camden Waterfront
1947

Click on Image to Enlarge

Pennsylvania Railroad
Roundhouse
on the
Camden Waterfront
late 1920s

Click on Image to Enlarge

Camden Waterfront
late 1920s

Click on Image to Enlarge

Camden Waterfront
south of Mickle Street
late 1920s

Click on Image to Enlarge

Pennsylvania Railroad
Roundhouse
on the
Camden Waterfront
late 1920s

Click on Image to Enlarge

Camden Waterfront
late 1920s

Click on Image to Enlarge

Camden Waterfront
late 1920s

Click on Image to Enlarge

Click on Image to Enlarge

Camden Brewery

Click on Image to Enlarge

Approach to the
Market Street Ferry
circa 1950
J.B. Van Sciver factory at rear

Click on Image to Enlarge

Camden Waterfront
1920s

Click on Image to Enlarge

Click on Image to Enlarge

Tug
Camden
1947

Click on Image to Enlarge

Camden Waterfront
and other places of significance
circa 1931

Click on Image to Enlarge

Camden Waterfront
1920s

Click on Image to Enlarge

Click on Image to Enlarge

Camden Waterfront
1950s

Click on Image to Enlarge

Camden Waterfront
1950s

Click on Image to Enlarge

COOPER HOSPITAL

Click on Image to Enlarge

 
KAIGHN AVENUE

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

Market Street
From West of North Third Street
circa 1910

Click on Image to Enlarge
Click on Image to Enlarge

Pennsylvania Railroad Ferry Terminal

Pennsylvania Railroad
Ferry Terminal
circa 1905

Click on Image to Enlarge

Pennsylvania Railroad
Ferry Terminal
1950

Click on Image to Enlarge

Pennsylvania Railroad
Ferry Terminal
circa 1910

Click on Image to Enlarge

Pennsylvania Railroad
Ferry Terminal
circa 1905

Click on Image to Enlarge

Pennsylvania Railroad
Ferry Terminal
circa 1905

Click on Image to Enlarge

Pennsylvania Railroad
Ferry Terminal

Click on Image to Enlarge

Pennsylvania Railroad
Ferry Terminal

Click on Image to Enlarge

Pennsylvania Railroad Ferry
BRIDGETON

Click on Image to Enlarge

Pennsylvania Railroad
Ferry Terminal

Click on Image to Enlarge

Pennsylvania Railroad
Ferry Terminal
circa 1910

Click on Image to Enlarge

Pennsylvania Railroad
Ferry Terminal
circa 1910

Click on Image to Enlarge

Pennsylvania Railroad
Ferry Terminal
circa 1940

Click on Image to Enlarge

Pennsylvania Railroad
Ferry Terminal
circa 1940

Click on Image to Enlarge

Pennsylvania Railroad
Ferry Terminal
circa 1940

Click on Image to Enlarge

Pennsylvania Railroad
Ferry Terminal
circa 1940

Click on Image to Enlarge

Pennsylvania Railroad
Ferry Terminal
circa 1940

Click on Image to Enlarge

Pennsylvania Railroad
Ferry Terminal
at the foot of Market Street

1919 Victory Arch
in honor of returning soldiers

Click on Image to Enlarge

Pennsylvania Railroad
Ferry Terminal
circa 1925

Click on Image to Enlarge

Pennsylvania Railroad
Ferry Terminal
circa 1905

Click on Image to Enlarge

Pennsylvania Railroad
Ferry Terminal
1952

Click on Image to Enlarge

Pennsylvania Railroad Ferry
VENTNOR
October 18, 1938

Click on Image to Enlarge

McAndrews & Forbes

DB-PF/McAandF.JPG  
DB-PF/McANandFORBES.JPG  
DB-PF/McANDREWSandFORBES.JPG  

RCA-Victor

 
 

Reading Railroad Kaighn's Point Ferry Terminal

Reading Railroad Ferry
Philadelphia

Click on Image to Enlarge

Reading Railroad
Kaighn's Point Ferry Terminal

Click on Image to Enlarge

C

Reading Railroad
Kaighn's Point Ferry Terminal

lick on Image to Enlarge

Reading Railroad Ferry
VENTNOR

Click on Image to Enlarge

Reading Railroad Ferry
ATLANTIC CITY

Click on Image to Enlarge

Reading Railroad Ferry
CAPE MAY

Click on Image to Enlarge

Reading Railroad Ferry
MARGATE

Click on Image to Enlarge

Reading Railroad Ferry
OCEAN CITY

Click on Image to Enlarge

Reading Railroad Ferry
PHILADELPHIA

Click on Image to Enlarge

Reading Railroad 
Kaighn's Point Ferry Terminal

Click on Image to Enlarge

Reading Railroad Tug
PENNLYN

Click on Image to Enlarge


Reading Railroad Kaighn's Point Ferry Terminal - 1931

Click on Image to Enlarge

Spruce Street Terminal

Spruce Street Terminal
north side view

Click on Image to Enlarge

Spruce Street Terminal
1973

Click on Image to Enlarge

Spruce Street Terminal
about 1938

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

Spruce Street Terminal

Click on Image to Enlarge

Spruce Street Terminal
south side view

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

Spruce Street Terminal

Click on Image to Enlarge

Spruce Street Terminal
1931

Click on Image to Enlarge

Beckett Street Terminal
&
Spruce Street Terminal
1931

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

Tugs

Tug
RODERICK McALLISTER

Click on Image to Enlarge

American Dredge Company Tug
SALEM

Click on Image to Enlarge

Tug
SAMPSON

Click on Image to Enlarge

Tug
WAGNER'S POINT

Click on Image to Enlarge

CURTIS BAY TOWING COMPANY TUGS - August, 1981

Click on Images to Enlarge

I am sending you some shots of Curtis Bay Towing tug boats that were all taken in August 1981 from Pier 5 North Delaware Ave looking towards Camden. I worked at Curtis Bay during the summer as my Dad was Port Engineer there and we both know Dave Boone as he was the dispatcher for the tugs. 

Thanks,

Jim Lapp

CAPE MAY
CAVALIER
Unknown Curtis BAy tug with container ship
LAMBERT POINT
LAMBERT POINT with container ship

Camden Courier-Post - June 2, 1933

MARINE TERMINALS SHOW BIG INCREASE OVER 1932 FIGURES
Cargo and Vessel Movements During May Both Better Than L
ast Year
8764 TONS LEAVE PORT

Cargo and vessel movements at the Camden Marine Terminals during the month of May, 1933, show a decided increase as compared with May, 1932,

The total amount of cargo handled during the month was 15,235 tons, an increase of 56 percent as compared with the same period in 1932. The number of ocean-going vessels dock­ing during the month was 25 as compared with 16 vessels during May, 1932.

Outbound shipments during the month amounted to 8764 tons as compared with 3476 tons in May, 1932. The outbound cargoes consisted large­ly of manufactured products from Camden and South Jersey industries, reflecting increased industrial activity in this area.

The inbound' freight movement amounted to 6740 tons as compared with 5769 tons in the same monthly period a year ago. These cargoes consisted of lumber from the Pacific Coast, wood pulp from Norway and Sweden and nitrate of soda from Chile, S. A.

The outbound shipments were de­stined principally to South Atlantic, Gulf, Pacific Coast, Hawaiian Islands and Far East ports.

On Friday, May 26, the S.S. J.L. Luckenbach loaded for the Pacific Coast one of the largest cargoes shipped from Camden in several months.

A comparison of tonnage trans­shipped through the terminals for the period from January 1 to June 1, 1933, as compared with the same period in 1932 shows an increase of 8340 tons, Or approximately 20 percent. Arrivals and departures of ocean-going vessels increased during this five-month period from 54 in 1932 to 101 this year.

At the present time 24 vessels are scheduled to arrive or depart from the Camden Marine Terminals during this month in addition to the daily sailings of the Ericsson Line to Baltimore, Maryland. 

Camden Courier-Post - June 13, 1933

TUGS AID FIREMEN AT TERMINAL BLAZE
Flames at Federal Street Pier of Pennsy Endanger Electric Coaches

Three tugboats equipped with fire fighting apparatus yesterday aided Camden firemen to smother flames at the riverfront repair shop of the Pennsylvania Railroad, at the Federal street ferry.

The fire, was under control within 15 minutes after the alarm was sounded. Damage was reported at $200. Twelve electric trains in the barn were undamaged. 

The car barn is built over the river, extending out about 150 yards, a short distance from the south end of the ferry terminal. The fire, which it is believed may have started from a cigarette, was discovered under floor boards. 

There were nine electric coaches inside the car barn and three others on a track outside. 
Two other electric coaches standing at the entrance to the shop hampered Camden firemen in reaching the scene of the blaze with their hose lines. At the same time city firemen were summoned, distress whistles, summoned the tugboats Atlantic City, Camden, and Greenwich. 
They sped to the scene quickly and were pouring water on the blaze when the city firemen got their hose lines into action. A large crowd traveling on the ferries to and from Camden gathered at the south end of the terminal to watch the fire. 

After getting the blaze under control, the firemen discovered there were still flames under the piering that could not be reached from above. Three firemen entered a row boat with C. A. Wilson, master mechanic in charge of the repair shop, and Harry Prickett, electrician in the shop. 

They rowed their craft under the pier, equipped with a small service hose, with which they extinguished the last of the flames.

The Pennsylvania Railroad Ferry Terminal
The repair shop pier is at lower right

Click on Image to Enlarge

Coming Soon: New York Shipbuilding Corporation Photos

RETURN TO DVRBS.COM HOME PAGE