Streets
of
Camden, NJ

Winslow
Street


WINSLOW STREET runs east from Broadway past South 3rd Street towards the Delaware River. Eight homes were built on the north side of the 300 block in 1899, in 2011 three of them, 341, 343, and 345 are still standing and occupied. In the 400 Block, sixteen homes were built in 1899, all are still standing and most are occupied as of June 2011. The Howland Croft Sons and Company textile mill, built in the 1880s, filled up the entire south side of the 400 block of Winslow Street. The mill was destroyed by fire on June 10, 2011, and three homes 409, 411, and 413 Winslow suffered smoke and water damage. Hopefully repairs can be made and the homes can be reoccupied. At the northwest corner of Broadway and Winslow Street a commercial building, 1913-1921 Broadway, was occupied for many years by a Mother's Koffee House, a wholesale tea and coffee company. This building was converted into apartments in the 1990s and is known as Winslow Court. 

Thanks go out to Rocco Borman for his help in editing this web-page.

Do you have an Winslow Street memory or picture. Let me know by e-mail so it can be included here.

 Phil Cohen
Friday, November 22, 2013


Aerial Photo of Winslow Street - circa 2010

Foot of Winslow Street
  1920s-1947
Southwark Manufacturing Company
imported chalk & whiting

Intersection of Ancona Street & Winslow Street
 
Click on Image to Enlarge

300 Block of Winslow Street
301 Winslow Street

2011
Container Recyclers
of Camden, Inc.

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

331 to 345  Winslow Street

Philadelphia Inquirer
March 26, 1915

Viola Street
Winslow Street
South 4th Street
Florence Street
William Sangtinette

Guarantee Realty - Ferry Avenue
Harry Varbalow - Samuel Varbalow
Henry J. Mockett

h
331 Winslow Street

Built in 1915
1947 Joseph Merlino
1969 Elwood J. MArtz
2011 Gone

  333 Winslow Street

Built in 1915
1947 Amerigo P. DiGiacomo
1969 C.W. Borman
2011 Gone

  335 Winslow Street

Built in 1915
1947 Charles DeFrancisco
2011 Gone

  337 Winslow Street

Built in 1915
1947 EdwardL. Galm
2011 Gone

  339 Winslow Street

Built in 1915
1947-1969 Michaeel A. Rossi
2011 Gone

341 Winslow Street

Built in 1915

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

341 Winslow Street

Built in 1915

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

341 Winslow Street

Built in 1915

1920s-1930s
John J. Cianfrani & Family
John J. & Mary Cianfrani
John Rocco Cianfrani

Left: John Rocco Cianfrani

  341 Winslow Street

Built in 1915

1947
James Cianfrani

  341 Winslow Street

1960s-1920s
Al Marcianna & Family
Al & Nancy Marcianna
Ronald A. MArcianna
Louis Marcianna
Regetta Marcianna

341 Winslow Street

Ronald A. Marcianna

We were neighbors on Winslow Street,  great friends with the whole family, Nancy and Al, Ronnies parents, brother Louis and sister Regetta. Al gave us our first train set for Christmas to run under the tree but the Lionel set was too big so we built a platform to run it around we still have that set today, it's made of metal the engine alone must weigh about 6 to 8 pounds alone. Ronnie was a terrific guy like his whole family was, he will be missed very much. RIP RON

Rocco Borman
February 19, 2012

343 Winslow Street

Built in 1915

1947 Pasquale Caramanna
1969 N.F. Caramanna

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

343 Winslow Street

Built in 1915

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

343 Winslow Street

Built in 1915

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

345 Winslow Street

Built in 1915

1947 Harry L. Butch
1969 Elwood J. Martz

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

 


Intersection of South 4th Street & Winslow Street
Click on Images to Enlarge
Northwest Corner - 1921 South 4th Street - Built in 1915
1918-1942 Walter Konopka's Tavern - 1947 Friendlly Tavern
- Photo taken June 25, 2011
Looking North - Photo taken June 25, 2011
Northeast Corner - 1920 South 4th Street - Photo taken June 27, 2011
Damaged by smoke and water from
Howland Croft, Sons & Co. fire, June 10, 2011
Looking East - Photo taken June 25, 2011
Rubble is the remains of the
Howland Croft, Sons & Co. mill, destroyed by fire, June 10, 2011

Click on Images to Enlarge


Aerial View of the 400 Block of Winslow Street - circa 2010

400 Block of Winslow Street
 
 
  400 Winslow Street

1960 Quaker City Installation & Service

 

409 Winslow Street

1947 Francisco DiGiacomo

Damaged by smoke and water
from
Howland Croft, Sons & Co. fire
June 10, 2011

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

409 & 411 Winslow Street

Damaged by smoke and water
from
Howland Croft, Sons & Co. fire
June 10, 2011

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

411 Winslow Street

1947 Charles Elkins

Damaged by smoke and water
from
Howland Croft, Sons & Co. fire
June 10, 2011

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

413 Winslow Street

1947 Steve Tirabasso

Damaged by smoke and water
from
Howland Croft, Sons & Co.
June 10, 2011

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

415 Winslow Street

1947 Pasquale DeFrancisco
1969 L. DIGiacomo

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

417 Winslow Street

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

417 Winslow Street

1930
Clifford Del Rossi Sr. & Family
Clifford Del Rossi (widower)
Angelo Del Rossi
Mamie Del Rossi
Florence Del Rossi
Evelyn Del Rossi
Thomas Del Rossi
Rita Del Rossi
Clifford Del Rossi Jr.

Left: Clifford Del Rossi Sr.

1947-1969 Peter Christy

 

417 & 419 Winslow Street

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

419 Winslow Street

1920s-1947
Thomas Scarduzio & Family
Thomas and Florence Scarduzio
Joseph Scarduzio
Thomas Scarduzio Jr.
Anna Scarduzio
Anthony J. Scarduzio
Albert Scarduzio

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

421 Winslow Street

1947-1969 Tony W. Ramick

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

421 & 423 Winslow Street

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

423 Winslow Street

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

  423 Winslow Street

1930
Carlo DiCarlantonio & Family
Carlo & Anna Natale Carlantonio
Andrew DiCarlantonio
Lucille DiCarlantoni
Martin DiCarlantonio
Anthony DiCarlantonio
Carlo DiCarlantonio

1947
Michael Gauanich

423 Winslow Street

Private Martin DiCarlantonio

425 Winslow Street

1920s-1947
Jacob "Jack" Russo & Family
Jacob & Nellie Russo

1969 B. J. Anderson

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

425 Winslow Street

1920s-1947
Jacob "Jack" Russo & Family
Jacob & Nellie Russo
Mildred Russo

Camden Courier-Post
June 2, 1932

Garfield S. Pancoast
Mary Delfico
Clinton Street

 

425 & 427 Winslow Street

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

427 Winslow Street

1947-1969 William J. Mariano

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

429 Winslow Street

1920s-1947
Dominic DiClemente & Family
Dominic & Anna DiClemente

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

429 & 431 Winslow Street

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

431 Winslow Street

Photo taken 2003

1928-1930 Frederick Baum

1940
Alexander Kluczynski & Family
Alexander & Sophie Kluczynski
Alfred L. Kluczynski

1947 Dominic DiClementi

431 Winslow Street

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

431 Winslow Street

Seaman First Class
Alfred L. Kluczynski

433 Winslow Street

1930
Joseph Francis & Family
Joseph & Helen Francis

1947Joseph Frezzini

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

433 & 435 Winslow Street

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

435 Winslow Street

1920s-1947
Joseph Oxley & Family
Joseph & Luciell Oxley

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

437 Winslow Street

1920s-1947
William Stewart & Family
William & Isabelle Stewart

1969 Andrew Pfefferle

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

437 & 439 Winslow Street

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

 

439 Winslow Street

1920s-1969
Leon Begich & Family

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

Winslow Court
1913-1921 Broadway

Photo taken June 27, 2011

Click on Image to Enlarge

 


Intersection of Broadway and Winslow Street
Click on Images to Enlarge
Southwest Corner - 1928 Advertisement 
The open area was maintained as a park for many years
Looking Southwest - June 27, 2011
Howland Croft, Sons & Company mill, destroyed by fire June 10, 2011, in background 
Looking West from Broadway - June 11, 2011
Looking West from Broadway - June 11, 2011
Looking Northwest - 1913-1921 Broadway - May 29, 2005

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TUCKER STEVEDORING CO. v. SOUTHWARK MFG. CO.

24 F.2d 410 (1928)

TUCKER STEVEDORING CO.
v.
SOUTHWARK MFG. CO.

No. 3745.

Circuit Court of Appeals, Third Circuit.

February 20, 1928.

Willard M. Harris, of Philadelphia, Pa., for appellant.
Acker, Manning & Brown, of Philadelphia, Pa. (Everett H. Brown, Jr., of Philadelphia, Pa., of counsel), for appellee.
Before BUFFINGTON, WOOLLEY, and DAVIS, Circuit Judges.

 BUFFINGTON, Circuit Judge.

Libelant, the Southwark Manufacturing Company, a user in its business of imported chalk, had its works and wharf at Camden, on the Delaware river, opposite Philadelphia; the respondent was a lighterage company. For some years, in pursuance of a contract embodied in letters exchanged between the parties for "lighterage and discharging," the lighterage company furnished lighters and towed the Southwark's chalk, arriving at the port of Philadelphia from abroad, and discharged the same at the Southwark's Dock in Camden. The lighterage company, on November 26 and 27, 1923, received from the steamship Verentia, lying at Philadelphia, 500 tons of Southwark's chalk on board the scow Katie, which it had furnished under such contract. Loading ended about noon of the 27th, after which the Katie was towed to the Southwark's wharf. She laid there until about 10 that night, when her master found she was listing from leaking. She continued to leak, and sank that night, and the chalk proved a total loss. The Katie's age and condition were such that she was abandoned. Thereupon Southwark filed this libel in personam against the lighterage company, alleging the loss and leakage was caused by the unseaworthiness of the Katie. The lighterage company in defense raised three questions, viz.: First, the Katie was seaworthy; second, her leaking was due to the fact that a spike in Southwark's wharf below water level caused it; and, third, that in any event it had never contracted the Katie was seaworthy, and consequently could limit its liability. On all these issues the court found against the lighterage company. Thereupon this appeal was taken, and the same questions are here involved.
On the two questions of fact, viz. that the Katie was unseaworthy and that the leakage and loss were due to that, and not to a nail or projection from libelant's wharf, we agree with the finding of the trial judge. Turning to the third question, we note that the contract here involved was for "the lighterage and discharging; we, to take the chalk, delivered to us in our barges, from alongside of steamers as per your request, and unload it from the barges into your small cars on the dock at Camden, N. J." The contract contained no stipulation that the barges were to be seaworthy, so the question is: Was there an implied contract of lighter seaworthiness, which the law writes into this contract for lighterage service? The present contract being for lighterage, we think there was an implied contract that the lighters would be seaworthy. In that regard we agree with the holding of The Loyal (C. C. A.) 204 F. 931, where it was said: "The vessel owner had a written contract with the cargo owner for lighterage services covering an extended period. This lighterage contract implied an obligation that the lighters to be furnished under it should be seaworthy. * * * The implied contract that the lighter was seaworthy, attached to the * * * contract, was, in our opinion, just as much the personal contract of the vessel owner as the express contract itself. It was precisely as if written in the contract."
Such being the case, and the contract in hand having imported into it a stipulation for seaworthiness, and thereby made the personal contract of the lighterage company, we agree with the reasoning of the Circuit Court of Appeals of the Second Circuit in the foregoing case, and that of the Sixth Circuit in Great Lakes Towing Co. v. Mill Transp. Co., 155 F. 11, 22 L. R. A. (N. S.) 769, where it is said: "It seems to us altogether unlikely