John
H.
Lennox



JOHN H. LENNOX was born in Ireland in 1879 to James and Katherine Lennox. The family had emigrated to Canada by 1881, when son William was born, and came to Camden in 1885. In November of that year another son, Edgar "Eggie" Lennox arrived. Mr. and Mrs. Lennox would have seven more sons, and a daughter, Margaret. James Lennox worked as a laborer with the railroad. The Lennox family lived at 515 Taylor Avenue from 1885 through 1888, at 422 Evans Street in 1890, 515 Felton Street in 1894, and at 832 Line Street from 1895 through 1897. By 1898 they had relocated to 705 Blaine Street

The 1900 Census shows the Lennox family at 705 Blaine Street. John H. Lennox was working as a helper in a blacksmith's shop at the time of the census. The family was still living at the Blaine Street address when the 1906 Camden City Directory was compiled. John H. Lennox was then working as a morocco finisher at one of Camden's leather factories.

John Lennox was appointed to the Camden Fire Department on November 27, 1907 and reported for duty on January 1, 1908. At the time of the 1910 Census he was still living with his parents and siblings. The family was then residing at 511 Newton Avenue. John Lennox was promoted to Captain in 1915, and assigned to Engine Company 8. In 1919 John Lennox married a widow, Caroline Osborn Lea. By 1919 they owned a home at 633 Clinton Street. Also at home was a step-daughter, Miriam Lea, then 17. 

Captain Lennox was promoted to Deputy Chief on April 4, 1928, with a salary of $2,800 per year. He was stationed at Fire Headquarters at Fifth and Arch Streets.

Mr. and Mrs. Lennox still resided on Clinton Street in April of 1930. Mother-in-law Louisa Osborne was then living with them. 

John H. Lennox was named as acting chief of the Camden Fire Department on December 1 of 1932 by then-Mayor Roy R. Stewart, succeeding Thomas J. Nicholas. John Lennox was made Chief on October 1, 1934.

Shortly after 7 A.M. on May 23, 1941, a Box was transmitted for a fire at West and Clinton Streets, South Camden. Arriving companies found a three-story commercial building with fire roaring one hundred feet into the sky. A second alarm was transmitted on arrival, followed by third and fourth alarms ordered by Chief John Lennox. The building contained a food market on the ground floor and a clothing factory above. At the height of the blaze, Firemen Clarence McMullen and James Creato narrowly escaped with their lives after a burst of flame nearly enveloped them as they forced an interior door to a shaft. Both members fought their way out under the cover of hose streams directed by their comrades. Chief of Department Lennox and four firemen while at the far end of the blazing building on West Street, heard the shrill cries for help coming from a nearby dwelling. Racing into the home of Mrs. Elizabeth O'Hanlon at 423 Clinton Street, they found an excited albeit unscathed parrot, in a kitchen birdcage still crying for help. The bird was carried to safety by the firemen. The blaze was brought under control at 10:30 A.M. but not before heavily damaging the block long building. 

After a long illness, John H. Lennox passed away in February of 1947. His widow Caroline was still residing at 633 Clinton Street in that year. Chief Lennox was succeed by Chief Walter Mertz.

John H. Lennox was preceded in death by his brother Edgar. Edgar Lennox, known as Ed and also by his nickname, "Eggie", was one of the best sandlot baseball players in Camden at the turn of the century. He rose to the major leagues, playing in parts of five seasons, and stayed in baseball as a player, umpire, and scout for most of the rest of his life, before passing in October of 1939.

Three of John Lennox's brothers were also know locally as good ballplayers. Brothers Robert and Samuel both played minor league ball. Samuel Lennox also played professional basketball as a member of the Eastern Basketball League champion 1919-1920 Camden Crusaders. 

Mrs. Caroline Lennox was active in Republican politics, serving as president of the Ninth Ward Women's Republican Club in the late 1920s.



Philadelphia Inquirer
November 28, 1907

Newton Ash - Ephraim Hires
Gardner Corson -
John H. Lennox
 
Herbert Hibbs - Dr. A. Haines Lippincott 
Charles H. Ellis - E.G.C. Bleakly

 

 

Philadelphia Inquirer
March 17, 1910

J.G. Reeves - North 7th Street - Market Street
Epiphany Evangelical Lutheran Church - Albert Hildreth
John Lutts - Peter B. Carter - John H. Lennox
Ephraim Tomlinson - Cgarles K. Perry
Mrs. Mary Baird Fox - Mrs. B.C. Reeves
Dr. William Knowlton - Dr. Oscar Grumbrecht
Dr. A. Haines Lippincott - Dr. Paul Mecray
Dr. Marvin Street - C.H. Haddon
Dr. Frank Horning - John T. Bottomley
John Croft -
Dr. Daniel Strock
Joseph Deacon - J.S. Reeves

Click on Images for PDF File of Full Article


Philadelphia Inquirer - December 20, 1910

This 1912 Robinson Combination Chemical and Hose Wagon was assigned to Engine Company 2. It was one of two purchased as the first motorized apparatus in the Department. Pictured in this 1913 photograph are (l to r): Fireman John Lennox, Wagon Chauffer Harry Hankins, Firemen William Elberson, Joseph Ernst, Martin Carrigan, and Captain George Wade. Accompanying them are members of the engine crew: Stoker Arthur Wingate, Driver Joseph Johnson and Engineer John Augustus "Gus" Dold.


Philadelphia Inquirer - March 5, 1913

John Lennox - William Hertline - Sylvester McGrath


Philadelphia Inquirer
July 30, 1915

John Stockton - Peter B. Carter - Thomas J. Nicholas
William Patterson - Charles Cook - Walter Mertz
William Casson - Robert Whitley - T.G. Middleton
John H. Lennox - John A.S. Hunt -  George Cattell
Engine Company 3 - Engine Company 4
Walter W. Johnson - Walter W. Lee
Clarence Baler -
Walter Wolverton
Albert Denise - William Barr - Bowman H. Shivers

Click on Images for PDF File of Full Article


Camden Courier-Post - January 10, 1928

MRS. LENNOX HEADS G.O.P. CLUB

Mrs. Caroline M. Lennox was elected president of the Ninth Ward Women’s Republican Association at the January meeting in the clubhouse, 536 Broadway. Others named to office are Mrs. Helen M. Henry, vice president; Mrs. May Platt, corresponding secretary; Mrs. Lillian Robinson, financial secretary, And Mrs. Ada V. Boyd, treasurer


Camden Courier-Post - April 4, 1928

...continued...

Thomas Nicholas - John H. Lennox - Rollo Jones - William Harring - Clarence Madden
George B. Wade
- William W. Patterson - George Hunt - David Ellis - George Saunders
Eli Hunt - William Van Pfefferle - William H. Toy - Leo Tomkins - Horace T. Molan
Laurence Boulton - George W. Garner - Felix E. Bendzyn - Harry H. Hess - Charles Jones
Thomas F. Gibbons - Byron Davis - John S. Anderson
Ladder Company 1 - Engine Company 3
Engine Company 6
- Engine Company 7 - Engine Company 9
 27th Street - Arch Street - Broadway Clinton Street
Federal Street
-  Ferry Avenue
-
York Street


Trenton Times
April 26, 1932

John Lennox
David Ellis
Michele Natale
Louise Pologruto
Joesphine Zangari

 3rd Street

 Benson Street


Camden Courier-Post - July 11, 1933
C.B. Coles & Sons Lumber Co. - Kaighn's Point - Knight Street - Front Street - Mechanic Street
Atlantic Avenue - Kaighn Avenue - South Second Street - Margaret Dolson - Robert Dolson
Engine Company 8 - George Tucker - Charles Voll
Dr. Arthur L. Stone - Mrs. Marion Richards
Henry C. Coles - John Bircher - John H. Lennox - James H. Long - Harry Hertline
Joseph Novack - E.H. Stewart
...continued...
Camden Clown Club - James Shay - Alice Williams - Alice Shay - William Shay
Stanley Berthelot - Henry Small - James Rice - William Haines - Anna Parker - Mary Numbers 
Engine Company 2 - Engine Company 7 - William Hopkins - Felix Bendzyn
Dennis Block - C.E. Wells - Howe Street - Cedar Street - Wiley Mission

Camden Courier-Post - July 11, 1933
Clarence Madden - John Mulligan - George Garner - John H. Lennox
Engine Company 4 - Engine Company 5 

Camden Courier-Post - January 11, 1938

John Lennox - Marshall Thompson - Leonard Megee - Walter Mertz
Rocco Fanelle - George W. Jackson - Cherry Street


Camden Courier-Post - February 5, 1938
CHECKED AND DOUBLE CHECKED
by
JIMINY

The way some of the members of the Camden County Republican Committee are behaving these days, the Democrats can stay home on their own meeting nights .... The Republicans are doing their work for them .... Now some 70 of the Republican committeemen have signed a petition to give Baird a job that won't pay him anything.... It's about time they're giving him something .... They took the U. S. Senatorship away from him .... Moore took the governorship away from him .... Woodruff took the state committeeship away from him .... The New Deal took the city commission away from him .... The New Deal took the freeholders away from him:.:. Somebody always is taking something away from Baird ....

It isn't a question of Baird's ability to fill the bridge job .... The only one to even mention that as an issue was Fred von Nieda .... He's a city commissioner, you know .... It's a matter of principle .... At least, that is what Florence Baker, state com­mitteewoman, says .... Mrs. Baker is telling Senator, Clee and others at Trenton that they owe it to Baird to support him for the job because he has always helped Clee ...Let's, in all fairness to Baird, look at the record .... In the primary, during an address at the First Ward Republican Club, Dave Baird stated he was for Cliff Powell against Clee .... Mrs. Baker did not come out against Clee .... She didn't come out against Powell. Instead, she said she was neutral. In the general election, Mrs. Baker said she was for Clee. Baird never said he was for Clee. (If he had, Clee's majority of 35,000 would have gone to Moore) ....

So we don't think that Mrs. Baker is very convincing when she tells Clee that Baird helped Clee .... She said that the Camden county legislative delegation helped Clee's program against Hoffman. Was Baird a Democrat last year? Sheehan, Roye and Lodge were .... Burling was a Republican, and helped Clee, but he is not for Baird. Perhaps it was because Baird "helped" Clee's program against Hoffman opposition, that Hoffman slipped in Baird's appointment without the knowledge of Burling or the state or county committee members .... Mrs. Baker stated at a banquet that she has copies of the Courier-Post in 1931 in which Baird was praised for his bridge work .... If anyone cares to look at our files, we will show what Mrs. Baker said about Baird in the neighborhood of 1931. ... Or what we said about Baird at other times .... Also what Mr. van Nieda and Frank Travaline said.

But enough ado about nothing .... All we've done is talked about Baird when it had been our plan instead to talk about politics.

* * *

The political ax is hanging over the head of a Mt. Ephraim official on the charge he is assuming too much authority ..... The political ax hanging over the heads of the Delaware township cops is about to be enmeshed in litigation .... One of the policeman is a member of the P.B.A. which will carry his fight into court in a case that will be a precedent for the other township cops, too .... Herb Taylor will be county engineer if it goes to a Republican .... It may be a Democrat however, and newest among the candidates, on that side of the ledger is former City Commissioner Carroll P. Sherwood .... There may be only one assistant county solicitor instead of two in which case it will probably go to Carleton Rowand, city school board member .... 

By the way, don't, be surprised if under the new contract between the city and county on maintenance of the City Hall, the city takes full control of the building with consent of the county ... Which will be tough on some of the county jobholders ...* * *.

Assemblyman Allen now denies he wants all us newspaper fellers to go to the guillotine ... He says he meant lawyers ... Charlie Humes wants to be guillotined ... Standing up ... Incidentally, Charlie is defending his last-place position in the ping-pong league tonight… Firefighter Lennox went to church the other day… And found the roof braced up. When will the borough of Merchantville fix up that dangerous hole in Browning road at the railroad tracks north of Maple Avenue? ... Or is that in the township?

Whenever the state police want Detective Wojtkowiak at the prosecutor's office, ·they ask for "Sergeant Watchyourcoatandhat" … The Mt. Ephraim commissioners are going to buy a police car for their chief ... He's also in for a pay rise ... Bellmawr's chief of police won't get the salary increase he wants, but he will get an additional allowance for the use of his car ... Runnemede's two new cops will also get pay increases …

The other day an alarm was sent to every police department in the county and also to the Philadelphia cops that a car had been stolen in Audubon ... The culprit is glad no cops saw him ... He was none other than a police official who wanted to borrow a storekeeper's car but took the wrong one by mistake ... His face is almost as red as Vince (deP) Costello's ... At the K. of C. roller skating exhibition the other night, Luke McKenna did a few fancy turns ... Vince recalled he, too, had been pretty good at one time, so he essayed to show his friends ... His intentions were better than his legs, and a couple of well-­wishers followed him around the floor with a stretcher.

This all happened quietly The Runnemede police received a complaint from two storekeepers ... It appears that a group of high school students from another town had stopped off at Runnemede to purchase some cakes ... Several other articles disappeared from the stores ... A few days later the dean of the high school went to Runnemede paid one shopkeeper $10 and the other $2.60 ... Representing the goods they said were taken ...

Aside to that clairvoyant weakly editor who reported yesterday that Joe Van Meter is going to be the Republican nominee for sheriff: A sheriff cannot succeed himself in New Jersey ... Silvio Fittipaldi, former Haddon Heights High star, is a veterinarian and doing nicely ... A Philadelphia college professor who lives in Pennsauken uses his spare time writing a book ... Home by 4.30 p.m. from work, he retires at 8 p.m., rises at 3.30 a.m., writes for four hours, breakfasts and goes to work ... The Playcrafters are busy rehearsing "Post Road" for Feb. 18 and 19 ... A warrant is in the mails for a suburban doctor ... Illegal operation ... Fred Homer. Merchantville song-bird, had an audition in New York recently before the Metropolitan Opera Audition Committee ... What Collingswood shopkeeper's missus is having trouble getting a costume for a minstrel show? ... They're still looking for better buses on Route 14 ...

Carlton Rowand told this one at a dinner the other night… The foreman on a western WPA job wired Farley for more materials to finish the job ... "We need 2000 shovels in a hurry," the foreman wired ..."We ran out of shovels," replied Farley. "Let the men lean on each other."


Camden Courier-Post * February 17, 1938
WONSETLER HAILED AS NEXT PRESIDENT OF STATE
Dinner Speakers Predict Camden Man Will Get Association Post
N. J. OFFICERS ATTEND

Robert Wonsetler, of the Camden Fire Department, was hailed as the next state president of the Firemen's Mutual Benevolent Association at the 41st anniversary dinner of Camden Local, No. 5, last night. It was held in Kenney's Cafe, with 150 members and their women folks attending.

The Camden man is now first vice president of the state association and state representative of the local. James Delaney, of Elizabeth, state president, and other state officers who were among the speakers predicted that when the local has its 42nd anniversary next year, it will have occasion to celebrate the election of Wonsetler as 1939 state president.

Other speakers were Mayor George E. Bruner, City Commissioners Mary W. Kobus and Frank J. Hartmann, Assemblyman Rocco Palese, Fire Chief John H. Lennox, Carlton W. Rowand, Bruce A. Wallace and Freeholder Edward J. Quinlan.

State officers attending, besides Delaney and Wonsetler, were Fred Bailey, Weehawken, second vice president; George Steele, Union City, recording secretary; Joseph Burke, Newark, financial secretary, and Jack Reed, Kearny, treasurer.

Surrogate Frank B. Hanna, who was toastmaster, referred to the three city commissioners present as "candidates for re-election without opposition."

Commissioner Kobus, head of the city fire department, was applauded when she announced wash-stands and showers are being installed in local firehouses and that windbreakers and new fire nets have been ordered.

"The firehouses in Camden are in better condition than ever before,"
Commissioner Hartmann said.

Officers of the Camden Local are Chester Andrus, president; W. Samuel Mountney, vice president; Nelson Andrews, recording secretary; Harrison Pike, financial secretary; Henry Zook, treasurer; Ralph Bingemann, sergeant-at-arms; William H. Harrison, chaplain, and Wonsetler, state representative.

Russell J. Anderson was chairman of the dinner committee, which included Harry Wagner, Arthur Batten, Harry Wilkers, David Humphries and Pike.


Camden Courier-Post - February 26, 1938
Charles H. Errickson - John H. Lennox - Mary W. Kobus

Camden Courier-Post - June 30, 1939

$100,00 FIRE SWEEPS STORE OF ANTRIM CO.
Several Firemen Hurt; Oil Plant and Homes Are Menaced

...continued...


Ralph Bingemann - John Lennox - Andrew Ballantine - John Strauss - Ray Smith - Lou Gold
Marvin Gold - Leroy Garrison - Emido Martelli -  Agnes Mitchell - Mrs. Roy Dilks - Albert Bowne 

Trenton Times - August 2, 1940
...continued...
John Lennox - Joseph R. Mich - John Plaskett - R.M. Hollingshead Co. Fire - Mathis Shipyard
U.S.S. Curtiss - New York Shipbuilding Corporation - Camden Shipyards

Trenton Times - May 23, 1941
John Lennox - West Street - Clinton Street - Korman's Wraps - Eastern Telephone Company 

Camden Courier-Post * July 1, 1941

The photograph on the left shows Edward Friant, of 124 North Thirtieth Street, descending from a tall building on a rope by using a life belt. The center scene depicts Charles Geitz, of 465 Mechanic Street, left, and Nicholas Iacovelli, or 1303 Decatur street, using asbestos suits in the middle of roaring flames. The suits, according to Fire Captain Ray Smith, instructor at the school, are able to withstand 1,750 degrees of heat. Ernest Wilkinson, of 1304 Park boulevard, is the man behind the mask on the right shown emerging from a building filled with formaldehyde gas.


Camden Courier-Post * July 1, 1941
50 Volunteer Firemen Complete Training for Emergency Duties
Graduates First of 500 to Be Trained by City for Huge Reserve
Similar to that in London; Defense Officials Praise Work

Camden's first group of war and emergency volunteer firemen received their "diplomas" last night on completion or their training at the fire school in No. 10 firehouse, Ninth street and Morgan boulevard.

They are the initial volunteers to be trained as a reserve for the city fire department in an emergency. The volunteers, 50 of them, will be on 24-hour call. Eventually more than 500 men are expected to receive the training course for a huge reserve similar to the corps of firemen now being used in London. 

The men range in ages from 11 to 59 years with Charles Smith, son of Sgt. Ray Smith, being the youngest, and Harry L. Freidel, the oldest. 

The training course started May 12 and the trainees have attended three sessions a week, Monday, Wednesday and Friday nights, for seven weeks under the direction of Fire Captain Raymond Smith, no relation to the sergeant, who is director of the training school. Smith is a graduate of Class 56, of the Philadelphia Fire Training School.

Each volunteer fireman will be issued an identification card which will hold his fingerprints. 

Class Praised 

Among those congratulating the graduates were Herbert E. Harper, chairman of the Camden Defense Council; William C. Schriver, council member; Fire Chief John Lennox and Captain Smith. Howard Odrain, deputy chief of the Philadelphia Fire Department with 31 years of experience in fighting fires, attended as an observer. 

"In behalf of the Camden City Defense Council, I want to thank you men for the hours and days you have put into taking this course," Harper told the graduates,

"You have been prompt in attendance and have been attentive. We don't anticipate any air raids or any acts of war-invasion, but we have an important problem in enabling national defense Industries in Camden city to make load in their Jobs. 

"The sabotage committee of the defense council has been visiting the local Industries encouraging the plants to set up their own fire fighting squads and many are doing so. You men will be needed in times of an emergency to aid these forces and to assist at industries where there is no fire fighting squads." 

Chief Lennox termed the volunteers "our second line of defense" and thanked them for their cooperation. 

Training Complete 

The course included training In all phases of fire-fighting from operating pumpers to climbing ladders and combating incendiaries, Rescue work also was included. The use of gas masks and asbestos suits in chemical firs, how to approach delayed bombs with snubbers and the proper methods of using extinguishers were taught. 
A demonstration was held outside the firehouse by the volunteers. Their activities included scaling ladders, using gas masks to enter a smoke house, climbing and working on the top of the fire tower, using an aerial truck, tying tools for the lifting to tools, working on the end of water lines, working on pumpers, hooking up to stand pipes, jumping into life nets, tying life ropes and using asbestos suits through flaming gasoline and oil. 

The Class 

The graduates included: George D. Wilkinson, fire marshal of the RCA Manufacturing Company, and his two sons, Ernest and George; Garfield Watson, sergeant of police at New York Shipbuilding Corporation; Lieut. George Hamilton, Jr., of the 157th Field Artillery; Captain William Hare, of the Kaighn Avenue-South Street Ferry. 

Harry B. Thompson, Earl Denby, Lester W. Giberson, Norman P. Maull, Joseph Leone, Samuel Schuele, George P. Smith, Joseph Marchese, Nicholas A. Messaro, Willam S. Martz, William E. Doan, Elwood P. Martz, Jr., Clyde Getzinger, George W. Grove, Stephen Kirby, James W. McCracken, William Watkin, Manuel Weiss, Riccardo DiGiacomo, Louis Cimini, William P. Walter, Sigmund Yakaski, Nicholas Iacovelli, Robert Holmes, Walter D. Lohrman.

Myer J. Mutter, Charles Geitz, Charles A. B. Smith, Howard Doerschner, Harry L. Freidel, Franklin L. Wright, Paul W. Kessler, Warren I. Carter, Creston Polland, Edward E. Friant, Frank F. Shropshire, Charles Gall, Albert E. Pine, Nicholas Cerasoli, George W. Williams, Joseph G. Foster, Joseph Elliott, George Hance and Irving L. Stiefel.


Camden Courier-Post - August 26, 1941

Henry Magin Laid to Rest By War Veteran Buddies
TRUCKS OF FLOWERS IN FUNERAL CORTEGE

Funeral services for City Commissioner Henry Magin were held today with his colleagues in official and veterans circles participating.

Services were conducted in city commission chambers on the second floor of city hall, in charge of Rev. Dr. W.W. Ridgeway, rector of St. Wilfrid's Episcopal Church.

The casket was carried by war veteran associates of the public works director, who died from a heart attack Friday. A color guard from the Veterans of Foreign Wars and the American Legion preceded the casket, followed by the four remaining members of the city commission, Mayor George Brunner and commissioners E. George Aaron, Mrs. Mary W. Kobus and Dr. David S. Rhone.

A guard of honor lined both sides of' city hall steps, 22 policemen on one side and 22 firemen on the other, representing Magin's age, 44 years.

Hundreds of men and women waited outside the building to pay their respects as the solemn procession filed by. Mayor Brunner had declared this morning a holiday for city employees. The casket was borne by Thomas Jackson and Samuel Magill, both past Legion commanders; Leon McCarty, past commander of August Walter Chapter, Disabled American Veterans; Richard Jermyn, past commander of Post 1270, Veterans of Foreign Wars; Benjamin P. Thomas, past captain of Sparrow Ship No. 1269. V. F. W.; and William Miller, past State commander, D. A. V.  

Three trucks were required to carry the floral pieces from the scene of the services to the National Cemetery at Beverly, where burial took place.  

An estimated 8000 persons from all walks of life paid their respects to the late official by viewing the body as it lay in state in the commission chambers.

The throng of mourners of Camden city and county was the largest to converge on a public building since the funeral of Fire Chief Charles Worthington, who was killed while fighting a fire almost 20 years ago. His body was placed on public view in the rotunda of the old county courthouse.

File Past Bier  

A continuous progression of people filed past the flag draped bier for more than three and one-half hours. Scores of Republicans and hundreds of Democrats joined in the tribute.

Services were conducted by Camden lodges of Elks and Moose. Military rites were conducted by the Fairview Post, American Legion, of which Magin was a founder and past commander. The tribute was led by Mitchell Halin, post commander, and C. Richard Allen, past department commander. 

James W. Conner, chief clerk of the city water bureau and past State Commander of the V.F.W., conducted rites at the grave.  

Mayor Brunner and Commissioners Kobus, Aaron, and Rhone came early and remained throughout the hours of viewing. Mrs. Helen Magin, the widow, and daughter Helen, attired in deep mourning, arrived shortly after 7:00 PM.

Embraces Widow, Daughter  

Commissioner Kobus, who knelt in prayer before the bier, arose and went over to Mrs. Magin and her daughter. Mrs. Kobus embraced and kissed the widow and daughter of the late commissioner. They were in tears.  

Three firemen and three policemen maintained a vigil as a guard of honor. They were Patrolmen Jack Kaighn, George Weber, and William Deery and Firemen Arthur Batten, Warren Carter and William Reed.

American Legion and V. F. W. members in uniform alternated as members of the military guard of honor. A detail of 50 policemen was under command of Acting Lieutenant John Garrity. Fifty firemen, under supervision of Deputy Chief Walter Mertz, assisted the patrolmen in handling the crowd, which at times choked the stairways leading to the second floor.  

Freeholders Arrive  

Albert H. Molt, director of the Board of Freeholders and Freeholders John J. Tull, Oscar Moore, Ventorino Francesconi, Stanley Ciechanowski, Earl Armstrong and Emil J. McCall arrived shortly after 7:00 PM. Moore and Tull wore American Legion overseas caps. Albert S. Marvel, clerk of the board, accompanied the freeholders.

Employees of the various bureaus in the department of public works, headed by Commissioner Magin, came in delegations with the highway bureau having 150, the largest number.  

Frank A. Abbott, acting director of the department, accompanied by James P. Carr, superintendent of Streets; led the highway bureau employees. Abbott is deputy director of revenue and finance and first assistant to Mayor Brunner. He was named by Brunner as acting director until the City Commission elects Mr. Magin's successor.

County Clerk Frank J. Suttill, City Clerk Clay W. Reesman, Fire Chief John H. Lennox and James A. Howell, chief of the city electrical bureau, attended, as did Albert Austermuhl, secretary of the board of education. Every city department sent a floral piece.

Outstanding Floral Tribute

Outstanding among the floral tributes was a six-toot broken circle of varied flowers, an offering from Mayor Brunner and Commissioners Kobus, Aaron, andRhone.

A floral chair was sent by the Camden Police and Firemen’s Association. The word “Rest” was made up of flowers. The offering of the Veterans League of South Jersey, an organization formed by Commissioner Magin and of which he was the first president, was a large floral pillow.

The freeholders and county officials gave a large floral basket. Floral tributes came from the employees of the board of education, the RCA Manufacturing Company, the police and fire bureaus, Pyne Point Athletic Association, the Elks, Moose and several Democratic clubs.  

The floral tributes came in such numbers yesterday afternoon that Funeral Director Harry Leonard and his assistants could not find room for them in the commission chamber proper. They were banked on both sides, in the rear and over the casket.

Among prominent officials and citizens who came to pay their respects were Congressman Charles A. Wolverton and his son, Donnell, Assemblymen Joseph W. Cowgill and J. Frank Crawford, Sidney P. McCord, city comptroller, Thomas C. Schneider, president of Camden County Council No. 10, New Jersey Civil Service Association.

Others at Bier

Others were Sue Devinney, secretary to Mrs. Kobus; Fred S. Caperoon; Henry Aitken, city sealer of weights and measures, Horace R. Dixon, executive director of the Camden Housing Authority; George I. Shaw, vice president of the board of education.

Sgt. Ray Smith, chairman of the Elks Crippled Children Committee and commander of East Camden Post, V.F.W.; Albert Becker, commander of Camden County Post 126, Jewish War Veterans; Dr. Howard E. Primas and Wilbur F. Dobbins, members of the Camden Housing Authority; Postmaster Emma E. Hyland; Samuel E. Fulton, member of the Camden local assistance board.  

Also former Assemblyman Rocco Palese, former Freeholder Maurice Bart and wife, County Detective James Mulligan, Deputy City Clerk William D. Sayrs, Mary King, secretary to City Clerk Reesman, Charles W. Anderson and John W. Diehl Jr., former members of the housing authority, Walter P. Wolverton, chief clerk of the public works department; Thomas J. Kenney, Maurice Hertz, Isadore Hermann, chief of the city tax title bureau; S. Raymond Dobbs; acting chief of city property, John Oziekanski, building inspector, Harry Langebein, city assessor.

Oliver H. Bond, housing manager of Clement T. Branch Village; former Judge Joseph Varbalow, acting city counsel John J. Crean, assistant City Counsel Edward V. Martino, Paul Day, secretary of city board of assessors, former Assemblyman William T. Iszard, Harry Roye, district director of NYA; Victor J. Scharle and Martin Segal, Democratic and Republican registrars, respectively, of the Camden County permanent registration bureau.  

Mrs. Marian Garrity and Mrs. Mary F. Hendricks, vice chairman and secretary respectively, of the Republican City Committee; Dr, Ethan A. Lang and Dr. Richard P. Bowman, members of the board of education; Edward J. Borden, Carl Kisselman, Harry A. Kelleher, Samuel T. French Sr., former Freeholder Walter Budniak, Coroner Paul R. Rilatt, County Treasurer Edward J. Kelleher, William Shepp, of the city legal bureau, Marie Carr, stenographer, mayor's office; Samuel T. French Jr., member, board of education.

Also John C. Trainor, member of the Camden County Board of Elections; Antonio Mecca, funeral director; Alexander Feinberg, solicitor of the housing authority, former Freeholder John T. Hanson, Sterling Parker and Paul Reihman, member of the county park commission.  

James O’Brien, commander of the Camden Disabled American Veterans, was in charge of services by veterans at the cemetery. Former Freeholder Edward J. Quinlan, county vice-commander of the American Legion, directed last night memorial services and was in charge of the firing squad at the grave.  


Camden Courier-Post
March 16, 1942

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George W. Frost
John H. Lennox
William Van Pfefferle
Stephen Szwak
Theodore Ellis
Benjamin Kauffman
A. Lee Newman
Catherine Burrichter
Sidney Lester
Ladder Company 2
Engine Company 1
Engine Company 2
Engine Company 3

Engine Company 7

Engine Company 8
Broadway
Dayton Street

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